BSC video 32: Who is the leader?

In a study of successful change, we interviewed 150 people in 12 different places and asked them “who is the leader?” Instead of the listing the 12 champions, they responded with 107 names.

In this video, Matt Andrews, highlights that successful change requires someone to authorize the change, motivate, provide money, empower the people, define problems, suggest ideas for solutions, convene people, connect to others and to implement. All these things cannot be (and usually are not) done by one person. Change does not happen as implementation by edict it happens when groups of people take risks and make change happen. You can watch the video below or on YouTube.

If you are interested in learning more about multi-agent leadership read who really leads development? and going beyond heroic leaders in development.

 

BSC video 31: Crawling together in Cambodia

Everyone agrees that building the rule of law is important. But building the capability of a justice system is a long and difficult process, often susceptible to isomorphic mimicry. In this video, Michael Woolcock, uses an example of legal systems in Cambodia to illustrate how the arbitration council had to learn how to negotiate together through a process that built collective capability and legitimacy. You can watch the video below or on YouTube.

You can learn more about the Cambodia Arbitration Council here, and read more about opening spaces for reform in Cambodia and Indonesia here.

BSC video 30: Learning by crawling

In development, external best practice is almost always used as a solution. In reality, however, finding solutions to tough problems is not so simple. In this video, Matt Andrews, illustrates that if you crawl the design space, you might end up with a hybrid solution that is possible and also works in your context. You do not have to limit yourself to one or two options only. You can watch the video below or on YouTube.

If you are interested in learning more, watch learn, iterate, adapt, and iteration is research in action.

BSC video 29: Iteration is reasearch in action

Iteration does not take a thousand years. You can immediately begin the process of learning through iteration and adaptation, after you define your problem. In this video, Matt Andrews, demonstrates the process of how you learn through iteration to ultimately solve your problem. You can watch the video below or on YouTube.

If you are interested in learning more, watch learn, iterate, adapt.

BSC video 28: Problem-driven sequencing

Most problems in the public sector are wicked hard and need to be deconstructed before they can be solved. In this video, Matt Andrews, builds upon the maternal mortality example and the ishikawa diagram to illustrate how you can sequence a reform in a contextually sensitive way, by involving the stakeholders to create a strategy that has quick-wins, longer-term solutions and identify areas that will require political feasibility and practical implementation capacity. You can watch the video below or on YouTube.

If you are interested in learning more, watch selling solutions vs. solving problems, real problem driven reform, constructing problems that matter, and deconstructing sticky problems.

BSC video 27: Deconstructing sticky problems

Most problems in the public sector are wicked hard. It is like getting stuck in quick sand. In this video, Matt Andrews, uses an ishikawa or fishbone diagram to illustrate how meta problems can broken down into manageable problems that you can mobilize support for and ultimately solve. You can watch the video below or on YouTube.

If you are interested in learning more, watch selling solutions vs. solving problems, real problem driven reform, and constructing problems that matter.

BSC video 26: Constructing problems that matter

A problem that matters is one that gets attention and mobilizes action. In this video, Matt Andrews, uses an example of program budget reform in an African country to illustrate how deconstructing problems can create the space to find and fit solutions. You can watch the video below or on YouTube.

If you are interested in learning more, watch selling solutions vs. solving problems and real problem driven reform.